How To Cope with Sales Rejection

Hi guys,

I have been wanting to take on the subject of rejection in selling professions for quite some time , BUT its not a very easy topic to write about.

I think homo sapiens are not attuned to accept rejection easily and therefore this becomes a very prickly issue in our lives.

BUT its an issues that needs attention especially for those of us in Sales who are front ending our corporate brands and bringing in the moolah.

I think that in order to be successful at sales, you need to be able to cope with rejection — an even to turn it into a goad that creates more success.

Once you understand this, rejection loses is power over you, and your ability to sell.

Your experience of rejection depends entirely upon three qualitative, subjective measurements:

  1. Frequency. Everyone can deal with some rejection, but how much rejection can you experience before you start taking the negative feedback to heart?  How many times can you contact a qualified prospect and get a negative response before you begin to take it personally?  Increase your tolerance, and rejection loses its hold over your future performance.
  2. Emotional Involvement. How emotionally involved can you become with somebody before you feel that the other person might know you so well that criticism hurts?  For example, you might be reluctant to close because you’re afraid that your customer might feel “buyer’s remorse” and stop liking you — a form of rejection.
  3. Perceived Importance.  As a sales rep, you’re likely to feel most comfortable contacting people who are of a similar (or lower) social class or educational background.  However, you might find yourself avoiding people whom you feel are more important than yourself, because their rejection of you might seem to carry more weight or authority.

Each elements is easily changed, fortunately.  Here’s how:

  1. Frequency. To make yourself less vulnerable in this area, you must differentiate between valid and invalid rejection. If the rejection is based upon something valid (like your basic approach), then you blame your approach and then change it.  If the rejection is invalid — as when a prospect “dumps” frustration — it has nothing to do with you, so you can easily ignore it.
  2. Emotional involvement. The cure for this subjective ailment is to believe in yourself and in your product.  If you truly believe in both, then there is absolutely NO reason why you shouldn’t want your true friends to be your customers.  If it turns out that your friend doesn’t want or need your offering, it’s not a rejection of you, but of the product and firm.  So it should have no power over you.
  3. Perceived importance. My mother always recommended imagining that you’re talking to the bigwig while he’s sitting on the toilet.  That doesn’t really help me, but I know what she’s talking about.  Look: most bigwigs are exceedingly average people who’ve stumbled into their success.  Their opinion means nothing in the long run, so don’t let it have any power over you.

I think the key skills that a mature sales professional needs to imbibe in himself/herself, is that of EQ (Emotional quotient)….a strong EQ will best equip you with the balance and poise to manage rejection when you go out there to get your business!!

I have extensively covered numerous aspects of selling skills and sales management in my blogs on wordpress….https://ashishtandon.wordpress.com

Please check out my blogs and feel free to ideate and provide me with your insights and suggestions…happy to learn from my peers and thought leaders.

Do connect with me on my professional FB page http://www.facebook.com/the.ashishtandon

You could also connect with me on LinkedIn http://in.linkedin.com/pub/ashish-tandon/4/427/188/

Don’t Let Your Brain Screw Up Your Sale

Hi readers,

I have often been asked by my mentees after a f_ck_d up sale on ….”where did we go wrong!!!???”

I did EVERYTHING that you taught me…EVERYTHING to the “T”, and yet the sale went to my competitor !!

Alright….

When it comes to success in selling, your brain can be your own worst enemy.

If you’re like most sales stars, your brain has a tendency to chatter away about the future, when having a conversation with a customer.  Even though you’re trying to listen, your brain is sending out all sorts of subliminal messages to your subconscious like:

  • “If I don’t make my quota for the month, my boss is gonna kill me…( Really…ask yourself this…are your KRAs all about numbers??? tch tch numbers are only 50% of your KRA my sales pro!!)
  • “If I don’t make this sale, I won’t be able to buy that Versace dress from my girlfriend…” (Man, get your priorities right, and then understand that those who love you will love you whether you got them that dress or NOT!!)
  • “I hope this guy doesn’t tell a boring story, because I’ve got a flight in two hours…” (Patience is a virtue in Good salesmanship my friend!! didnt you know this..)
  • “What should say say next, in response to what he’s saying now…” (Being presumptuous are we …)
  • Etc. Etc. Etc.

This mental chatter frantically pulls your attention away from the customer and towards your own priorities and goals.  That can be fatal to actually making the sale because you’ll miss cues and clues about what the CUSTOMER wants.

In short, the CUSTOMER will cease to be king in your subconscious and you will inevitable wander AWAY from a sale that YOU THOUGHT was in your bag!!

The solution is to treat selling more as a process and less as an achievement.  Here’s how:

  • STEP #1: Open your posture. Body language and engaged listening are inter-related. When the customer is talking, you’ll be more interested, and seem more interested, if your expression and posture indicates that you are interested.  This is not trickery; it’s everyday human behavior.
  • STEP #2: Look AT the customer. When you’re thinking of the future, or something that you’re going to say, your eyes will lose focus or drift slightly upwards.  Keeping your eyes FOCUSED on the customer (without staring through the customer) forces your mind into the moment.
  • STEP #3: Be aware of your breathing. Because you’re human, it’s nearly impossible to keep all of your thoughts away from yourself.  Rather than listen to your internal chatter, become aware of the sound and flow of your breathing, which won’t distract from your focus on the customer.
  • STEP #4: Stop to take notes. When the customer says something that you’re sure is important, rather than breaking your focus by glancing down and making a note, ask for a moment’s pause, and then make a note.  Segmenting the two activities ensures that you’re present during the conversation.
  • STEP #5: Trust your instincts. You may believe you need to analyze everything that’s going on in the conversation in order to come up with the “right” response.  However, you’re more likely to say the “right” thing if you’re actively listening and then responding in a way that “feels” right.
  • STEP #6: Be patient with yourself. Selling is the study of a lifetime, so you can’t expect to grasp every concept or master every technique immediately.  Fortunately, what’s most important in sales is the combination of intention and attention.  Make the sale about the customer.  It’s really that simple.

To know more about sales acumen read

https://ashishtandon.wordpress.com/2013/01/11/what-every-manager-should-learn-from-sales/

https://ashishtandon.wordpress.com/2013/01/11/what-we-can-learn-from-sales-gods-and-succeed/

https://ashishtandon.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/if-you-want-to-sell-more-get-curious/

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://in.linkedin.com/pub/ashish-tandon/4/427/188/

Better Questions = Faster Selling

Hi readers,

This blog is a natural fit after my blog on https://ashishtandon.wordpress.com/2013/05/04/the-10-best-questions-to-warm-up-a-cold-prospect/

After you have suitably warmed a suspect to a prospect, what sort of smart questions do you need to ask such that your sales cycle is reduced and you are able to close a deal at the earliest, at the same time, creating client delight.

I figured that an appropriate example would be just the right thing to explain a suitable line of action that could get you your desired result.

Questions serve three functions in a sales conversation. First, they elicit more information about the prospect, thereby allowing you to learn more about how (and if) you can help. Second, they move the conversation forward, so that you can continue to ask more questions, and learn even more. Third, they help build rapport with the prospect so that you can more easily move the entire sale forward.

With that in mind, the absolute worst kind of questions to ask are those that have a one word , monosyllabic answer. Example:

Sales Rep: What CRM vendor are you currently using?

Prospect: Oracle.

While the above question does elicit information, it does not move the conversation forward. Making the question open-ended does both. Example:

Sales Rep: What was your decision-making process when you selected a CRM vendor?

Prospect: We put together a cross-functional team which looked at different vendors. We decided that Oracle would be the best choice for us.

Sales Rep: What were the most important criteria for the decision-making?

While the above question both elicits information and keeps the conversation moving forward, it would be even more effective if it also helped build rapport with the prospect. The easiest way to do this is to assume that the prospect has something uniquely interesting to say. Example:

Sales Rep: The economy is tough but I’ve read that your company plans to use sales technology to help weather the tough times. How did your team come up with that plan?

Prospect: Well, we’ve been through some similar situations in the past and, when we got early warning that sales might drop…

In the above question, the prospect has essentially been given the permission to brag about his firm and his participation in helping his firm be successful. Since people like talking about themselves and their achievements, the prospect will probably warm to the subject, and the entire conversation will be more productive. And that, in turn, will make the sales cycle faster.

Personally , an eclectic mix of open ended and close ended questions worked best for me during my roles as a solutions sales specialist.

Based on the vertical that you are engaged in and the product or service that you sell, ideally a set of 10 , a mix of open ended as well as close ended questions work best to help you close your sale with your client, and leaving the client feeling that in you he has a friend and consultant for life!!

Happy selling!!

The other 5 reasons that sales hates marketing!

Hi readers,

This is the second part of my blog posted some minutes back….https://ashishtandon.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=523&action=edit (Top 5 Reasons Sales hates Marketing)

As promised, this blog covers the other 5 reasons why sales teams hate their marketing counterparts!!

REASON #5: Marketeers pose as “strategists.”

  • Description: Marketeers think they’re “brand managers” who should be directing all activities throughout the company.
  • Why It Rankles: Brand is a reflection of product and service.  If good, the brand is good; if not, the brand is bad.
  • What’s The Cure: Only reward marketeers for behavior that directly results in a measurable increase in revenue and profit.

REASON #4: Marketeers waste resources.

  • Description: Marketeers expend money on fancy brochures, advertisements, and trade show junkets.
  • Why It Rankles: The more money that’s spent on Marketing’s boondoggles, the less money there is to pay commissions.
  • What’s The Cure: Give the sales team veto power over all marketing activities that exceed a fairly small amount of money.

REASON #3: Marketeers pretend they’re engineers.

  • Description: Marketeers try to set the technical direction of the firm’s products and services.
  • Why It Rankles: In most cases, the Marketeers have never even spoken to a customer, so they’re clueless about what they want.
  • What’s The Cure: Let the engineers design the next generation based upon customer input.  Keep marketing out of the picture.

REASON #2: Marketeers force technology on Sales.

  • Description: Marketeers pressure the sales team to enter reams of customer data into the CRM system.
  • Why It Rankles: The sales team knows full well that most of that data isn’t going to help generate more sales.
  • What’s The Cure: Set up your sales tech so that it always increases the amount of time that sales reps can spend selling.

REASON #1: Marketeers pass along lousy leads.

  • Description: Marketeers provide lists of leads that are either unqualified, or unqualifiable.
  • Why It Rankles: When Sales complains, the marketeers make it personal, accusing the sales team of being unable to sell.
  • What’s The Cure: Fire any marketeer who can’t consistently provide leads that the sales team – with its current skill set – can’t sell to.

Well what do you think folks!!

Love to have your views on this and my other posts!!

 

Top 5 Reasons Sales Hates Marketing

Hi Readers,

This blog covers what often simmers in sales teams of the best organizations….

Sales feels “neglected” when marketing takes all the kudos for the results, and feel singed when they take the heat for results NOT delivered!!

reasons are numerous and in this blog I will take just 5 that I feel are important right now to start this discussion..

REASON #1: Marketeers act superior.

  • Description: Marketeers often have business degrees, so they think they’re better than sales reps who don’t need a degree to sell.
  • Why It Rankles: Business degrees are generally useless when it comes to sales and marketing, since what’s taught is a mix of accounting and biz-blab.
  • What’s The Cure: Require MBAs to spend at least six months in Sales before being allowed to work in Marketing.

REASON #2: Marketeers want to eliminate Sales.

  • Description: Marketeers are taught in business school that good marketing makes a sales force unnecessary.
  • Why It Rankles: Unless a product is a plug-and-play commodity, a sales rep is always a necessity.  Especially in B2B.
  • What’s The Cure: Make it clear in the charter of the marketing team that they are there to support the sales team, not to replace it.

REASON #3: Marketeers believe selling is easy.

  • Description: Marketeers think that they can create so much demand that selling will consist purely of taking orders.
  • Why It Rankles: Most demand creation activities don’t create demand, especially in B2B, where customers generally ignore ads and collateral.
  • What’s The Cure: Have the marketeers make sales calls – or field inside sales calls – so they can see how hard it is.

REASON #4: Marketeers are goaled on deliverables.

  • Description: Marketeers get paid when they produce leads, brochures and ads, even if none of that activity results in a single sale.
  • Why It Rankles: If sales pros don’t make sales, they don’t get paid and, if it goes on long, they get fired.
  • What’s The Cure: Goal and compensate Marketing on the ability of the Sales team to generate revenue and profit from Marketing’s leads.

REASON #5: Marketeers think they’re “driving Sales.”

  • Description: Marketeers see selling as only one tactic in a grandiose strategic campaign.
  • Why It Rankles: Sales reps know that marketing is only a service function to the sales team, which makes the uppity behavior annoying.
  • What’s The Cure: Make it clear that Marketing is subservient to Sales by placing the CMO under the CSO.

Please do post your views on this blog…AND i would love to have comments from both SALES and MARKETING!!

5 MORE reasons to follow …so keep watching this space!!

Do you think that before taking a marketing assignment, the manager needs to spend time in sales?

Hi guys,

This poll is being posted for assessment of 2 topics that I have touched upon in my blogs recently- these topics are

  1. What Every Manager Should Learn From Sales
  2. Top 10 Reasons Sales Hates Marketing

Your inputs will help me develop a much more balanced view point on this subject and to then translate this balance into harmony between sales and marketing functions in silo organization structures.

AND please do post your comments on this as well as other blogs that I have written on this subject- some of these may have been controversial, but its always good to have diverse points of view.

Actually with the diversity of all your view points, I gain much much more and get to learn a new thing every day.

This is part of my promise to my self that I will learn something every new day!!